Arizona's Punk Rock Resource
The newest venue on Tucson’s block is presenting a californicationalized night of touring music this Wednesday, featuring San Jose’s Stickup Kid, which just released a “name your price” 3-song EP download via bandcamp, and the melodic punk of Heart to Heart, recently signed with Anchor 84 Records for the release of its 7” record this spring.
Also on the bill is local act O.C.D., and rumor has it that the venue may be seeking other bands to join in the fun.
Jan. 12 / 8pm / Project Noise Venue / 657 W. St Marys Rd., Tucson / $8 / All Ages

The newest venue on Tucson’s block is presenting a californicationalized night of touring music this Wednesday, featuring San Jose’s Stickup Kid, which just released a “name your price” 3-song EP download via bandcamp, and the melodic punk of Heart to Heart, recently signed with Anchor 84 Records for the release of its 7” record this spring.

Also on the bill is local act O.C.D., and rumor has it that the venue may be seeking other bands to join in the fun.

Jan. 12 / 8pm / Project Noise Venue / 657 W. St Marys Rd., Tucson / $8 / All Ages

A two-day DIY punk/hardcore fest triple-slams Tempe/Mesa this coming weekend, with more than a dozen acts appearing at three venues.
The Friday night opening salvo of Sundown Showdown 3, as detailed above, begins at Palo Verde Lounge (1015 W. Broadway, Tempe).
Saturday’s debauchery starts at 2pm and goes well into the wee hours.
Saturday, Jan. 22nd —
DAY SHOW (2pm-7pm) @ Hollywood Alley (2610 W. Baseline, Mesa) / $3 cover / with Sexual Slurs, Cosmeticators, Robot Tank, Female Trouble, The Pods, and DJ Ryan Wong.
NIGHT SHOW (8pm-2am) @ Yucca Tap Room (29 W. Southern, Tempe) / No cover / with Drone Throne, Avon Ladies, Becky Lee Band, Destruction Unit, A’rk (from Yucca Valley, CA), and DJs T.Murder & Horsepussy.
Thankfully, you can take full advantage of Sunday traditionally being a day of rest… you’ll have earned it.

A two-day DIY punk/hardcore fest triple-slams Tempe/Mesa this coming weekend, with more than a dozen acts appearing at three venues.

The Friday night opening salvo of Sundown Showdown 3, as detailed above, begins at Palo Verde Lounge (1015 W. Broadway, Tempe).

Saturday’s debauchery starts at 2pm and goes well into the wee hours.

Saturday, Jan. 22nd

DAY SHOW (2pm-7pm) @ Hollywood Alley (2610 W. Baseline, Mesa) / $3 cover / with Sexual Slurs, Cosmeticators, Robot Tank, Female Trouble, The Pods, and DJ Ryan Wong.

NIGHT SHOW (8pm-2am) @ Yucca Tap Room (29 W. Southern, Tempe) / No cover / with Drone Throne, Avon Ladies, Becky Lee Band, Destruction Unit, A’rk (from Yucca Valley, CA), and DJs T.Murder & Horsepussy.

Thankfully, you can take full advantage of Sunday traditionally being a day of rest… you’ll have earned it.

The Handsome Family brings its unique southern gothic alt.country act to Phoenix next weekend, on tour in support of the Scattered: A Further Collection of Lost Demos, Orphaned Songs and Odd Covers CD, or simply as an excuse to follow the ceaseless migrations of the wildebeest across the land undetected.

Opening the show is Where Dead Voices Gather (featuring members of Turn Back O Man), and Sean Rowe.

Rhythm Room (1019 E. Indian School Rd) / Sunday, Jan. 30 @ 8pm / All Ages / advance $10 (available at Zia Records, Stinkweeds, Hoodlums, or online HERE) or $12 day of show

Minneapolis’ Sleeping in the Aviary makes two stops in AZ this week, foisting its chaotic live showmanship upon the unwashed desert masses, as part of a national tour to promote the new Great Vacation! album.

Check links for more show details…

Wed, Jan 26 @ 8pm / The Hang Art (512 N Echols Ave, Tucson) / with Logan Greene & the Bricks, and Monster Pussy

Thurs, Jan 27 @ 7:30pm / The Trunk Space (1506 NW Grand Ave, Phx) / with Andrew Jackson Jihad, and The Roar

Music with Sound: Avant-gardism Trumps Pop Culture in Performance with Gordon Monahan

by Pete Petrisko

It’s not often that Phoenix is privy to the national premiere of an experimental music composition, but that’s exactly what it’ll witness when internationally-renowned sound artist Gordon Monahan unveils Sauerkraut Synthesizer during a special First Fridays After Hours show, at the .anti_space venue, on February 4th.

The composition, previously performed in Toronto and Kitchener, Ontario, uses naturally-occurring voltages in fruits and vegetables “to control parameters of a software synthesizer designed in Max/MSP”.

Monahan will also be performing his seminal piece Speaker Swinging, in which loudspeakers, attached to cables while broadcasting simple sine tones, are swung in a circular fashion by three performers. It’s the trajectory of the speakers through the performance space that sculpts the sound, and causes the audience to hear a dramatic Doppler effect.

Below, Monahan answers some questions for us about his work and upcoming performance.

AzK: Will you briefly explain the concept, and aesthetic, of “irritainment”?

GM: In a literal way, it’s irritating entertainment, but there’s a little bit more to it than that. It comes about through the idea that, as an artist, it can be a valuable thing to embrace the idea of failure - not intentionally, but when you fail to do something the way you initially envisioned it, you often stumble upon some other very interesting things as a result. On the other hand, there can be things where other people have failed in the past that can be inspiring in a postmodernist way. So you can take, say, music from the 70s, that was poorly done in a B-quality manner, and listen to it nowadays in a whole new light because several decades have passed, and aesthetics and technology has changed - so what would happen if you had an event where people only played that music for eighteen hours? That’d be an irritainment event.

I also do enjoy occasionally coming up with pieces where the end result can either be annoying for some people to listen to, or interesting for other people to hear, and may require some kind of extreme use of sound that I recognize as being “irritaining” because I sought to render that aesthetic. I know it’s irritaining because I’ll get a lot of people either complaining about it or loving it.

AzK: Can you give us some insight into your compositional technique - from inception, to development of elements used, into actual performance - using Sauerkraut Synthesizer as your example?

GM: In that particular case, it’s essentially based on a technical set-up that I then use to derive the end sonic results. To explain what I mean, I was working with a movement-based performance group in Vienna last year, and the director wanted to do this new piece using lemons as a thematic element. I said, “You get very small voltages out of lemons, perhaps we can try using those as control-voltages in a software synthesizer.”

While I didn’t go through with them on the lemon project, they did it themselves, I decided to use this same technical phenomena, with a variety of different fruits and vegetables - including a jar of sauerkraut.

Basically, I use six different fruits and vegetables, putting a copper terminal and galvanized terminal into each, to get approximately one volt coming out of that. I send that into the inputs of an arduino board, attached to a computer USB port to bring in real world sensing data, so the variable voltages are assigned to different parameters of the synthesizer. I set up a few different patches to create interesting sounds, but it’s not so much the sounds but more the methodology used to create those sounds that’s most important.

I don’t do electronic music that often, and when I do I want a good reason to do it. I tend to want to have very specific concepts to base my pieces on, and not just play an instrument to make sounds. I want to have a reason to be playing that instrument. It’s not out of any kind of elitist attitude, it’s just the demands I put on myself as an artist.

AzK: How’d you choose the fruits and vegetables used in the piece?

GM: I started with experimenting to see if, indeed, you do have different voltages from, let’s say, a tomato or an apple or banana, and would they be less or more than a lemon. I found that they’re all basically consistent, which was kind of a surprise to me. You have to have a fruit or vegetable that has some kind of moisture content, so, an apple or orange, or dill pickle, would work.

I chose six, and tend to use the same six, because there’s an aspect to the synthesizer that shows the visual read-out of the voltages on a screen that’s put up on a monitor projection so people can see that in real time. I built it so that number one would be an apple, number two a potato, number three a banana, and so on.

AzK: The visual aspect of your work seems less a complimentary element and more a specific means used to immerse the audience into the aural experience. How do you incorporate visuals into your work to heighten the experience?

GM: About half my work is not performative-based, but sound installation, so you’re already dealing with specific physicality of materials or objects, which have a visual element to them. So that influences my performative-based work.

Specifically in Speaker Swinging, I realized the visual component was very important because the sound being produced is because of the physical process taking place. Namely, the swinging around of speakers on cables and rope, which thereby creates the Doppler effect.

When you see the piece live, which goes on for about 25 minutes, the physicality of doing that action becomes an athletic event as much as a musical performance. In fact, there are different elements to that piece. It’s a sound performance. It has a sportive action to it. It has a performance art part, which is this sense of threat to the audience as speakers swing around, potentially hitting something, which it doesn’t but it’s implied - which creates tension. Then there’s the performance aspect of endurance, swinging those speakers for 25 minutes, so there’s this sweat and struggle involved with it. These are all different layers, none of which dominates over any other, but are all there mixed together at the same time.

I realized there’s this threatening part to it, that I’ve enhanced by adding more lighting. On the one hand to mark the orbital trail of the swinging of speaker but, at the same time, switching to pitch blackness and turning lights on and off, which would then create more tension by enhancing the threat element. When you do that, you’re automatically bumping up the visual aspects of it, which are very much tied with the physical action and with the reason for doing it - to create the Doppler effect and making a sound piece out of it.

AzK: What role does the architecture of each physical space play in your work?

GM: Architectural elements play a very large role and, in some ways, it can play a very subtle role. Naturally, architecture defines the acoustics, which, in a place that has natural reverberation, with a lot of concrete surfaces, you’ll tend to have a hard edge. It may not be good for some kinds of music, but it’s particularly good for Speaker Swinging.

Architecture plays an important role in a lot of my work. Once I began to realize how important it is to music, I’ve always tried to create pieces that incorporate architectural elements that help to structure the piece.

AzK: To what extent are your sound pieces pre-planned and how much of a role does indeterminacy (or randomness) play?

GM: Sometimes indeterminacy is built into the piece, it depends on the piece I am doing, and in some cases it’s all extremely planned out.

So, for instance, Speaker Swinging is all pretty much planned out, because I’ve done it so many times. For the first few years it was a question of exploring and developing it but, once the piece evolved to a certain point, I’ve always sort of maintained it in that way. I know what the piece is, it’s not written out in a musical score in any way, but more like a procedure of how to tune the oscillators I’m using. On the other hand, I do it all by ear as well, so there is a somewhat indeterminate element to it, in that I never repeat the same frequencies. So there’s a site-specific element to it that way.

With Sauerkraut Synthesizer, there’s pre-planned progress from one position in the piece to another, but how I get there changes every time, and how long each section might be changes every time. So there’s variables to it, but I wouldn’t say it has the indeterminate chance element in the same sense as (John) Cage’s music.

AzK: How do you view the role of the listener in a sound art performance?

GM: It’s the third element. There’s the composer, the performer, and the listener - the triangulation of the aesthetic experience. It’s a key process in creating of music because, if you don’t have anybody to listen to it, then you’re the only one listening.

Then the listeners play a role in the sense that they interpret what they want to interpret out of the piece. You don’t the deliver the piece of music and say, “This is what the piece is about and you’re going to get this out of it.” The piece is delivered to them, and I expect them to get whatever they want to get out of it. I might get ten completely different responses, from ten different people, from exactly the same performance - depending on what they’re thinking, or what their aesthetic background is, or where they were in the space, or the mood they were in or whatever. But if you recognize that’s going to be the situation, then you accept it’s part of the process.

AzK: What kinds of responses have you gotten from audience members after experiencing Speaker Swinging?

GM: A range of experiences, but my favorite kinds of responses are conceptual or intellectual. My least favorite would be emotional. The reason I say that is I think people put too much emphasis on emotion in music, and not enough on the conceptual and intellectual aspects. I’ve had these discussion with other musicians I’ve collaborated with, where you’ll have the extreme case in which the musician will say, “Music is all about emotion, it’s all about my expression”, and I’ll say, “Yeah, well, there’s a long list of things music is about, and emotion may be one of them. But music is concept, music is religion, music can be sacred or secular, music is lifestyle, music is science, music is acoustics, music is philosophy, music is many things and one of those things on the list is that music is about expression.”

So I prefer it when people get more than just emotion out of my performance. I like to see them get a wide range of things and, as I said before, ten different audience members will come up with ten different reactions to the performance even though they were in the same space at the same time.

AzK: We’d consider so many different reactions to be the sign of a successful performance…

GM: I’d consider that to be successful, yeah.

In addition to Gordon Monahan, the evening’s Elektrostube bill includes Laura Kikauka, Barry Schwartz, and Elektrobahn (Dayvid LeMmon/Scot McKenzie), with abstract architectural projections by Hugo Ross.

anti_space (715 W. Buchanan St) / Friday, Feb. 4 @ 9pm / $10 at the door

(photo 1 from Monahan website; photos 2 & 3 courtesy of sccarts.org; event photo illust. from Elektrostube)

We’re suckers for old technology, so can’t help but share a flyer displaying wax cylinder players. Luckily, the show it promotes isn’t crap. That could’ve been awkward.
First Saturday’s Get Lost series is held at the Lost Leaf, where patrons can tempt their worldly palate with a large selection of bottled beers from four corners of the globe - including a varied assortment of fine dark lagers and stouts. There’s also light ales and fruit beers, as favored by weekend hipsters and feisty felines alike, available on the menu.
But the bar/gallery’s focus is on the music, with this month’s edition of Get Lost featuring Coats and Villa, Colorstore, Lauren Farrah, and Haunted Cologne.
The Lost Leaf / 914 N. 5th St. / Saturday, Feb 5th - 5pm to 12am / Free / 21+

We’re suckers for old technology, so can’t help but share a flyer displaying wax cylinder players. Luckily, the show it promotes isn’t crap. That could’ve been awkward.

First Saturday’s Get Lost series is held at the Lost Leaf, where patrons can tempt their worldly palate with a large selection of bottled beers from four corners of the globe - including a varied assortment of fine dark lagers and stouts. There’s also light ales and fruit beers, as favored by weekend hipsters and feisty felines alike, available on the menu.

But the bar/gallery’s focus is on the music, with this month’s edition of Get Lost featuring Coats and Villa, Colorstore, Lauren Farrah, and Haunted Cologne.

The Lost Leaf / 914 N. 5th St. / Saturday, Feb 5th - 5pm to 12am / Free / 21+

You have only three chances to catch a tour kick-off show with The Necronauts this week. You won’t find ‘em in a nearby fourth room soon, so try not to blow it between now and Friday.

Yucca Tap Room (29 W. Southern, Tempe) / Wednesday, Feb. 16 @ 9pm / with Dry River Yacht Club, Snow Songs, and Female Trouble / Free / 21+

Rhythm Room (1019 E. Indian School, Phx) / Thursday, Feb. 17 @ 7pm / with Dry River Yacht Club and Lisa Savidge (in its own CD release show, cover includes CD) / $10 / All Ages

Red Room (100 E. Congress St., Tucson) / Friday, Feb. 18

Avon Ladies is Facebook braggin’ on its new set of songs, saying the music is “10x faster, 20x louder and infinitely times more violent” now. With hype like that, how will we ever maintain sanity over the next 48 hours… without breaking shit while we wait?
Weird TV, Avon Ladies, Nihilism, Andy Nutrition and the Sherms
…with more event info HERE.
Sound Kontrol / 25th St. and Chambers St., Phx / Sunday, Feb 20 / 8pm

Avon Ladies is Facebook braggin’ on its new set of songs, saying the music is 10x faster, 20x louder and infinitely times more violent” now. With hype like that, how will we ever maintain sanity over the next 48 hours… without breaking shit while we wait?

Weird TV, Avon Ladies, Nihilism, Andy Nutrition and the Sherms

…with more event info HERE.

Sound Kontrol / 25th St. and Chambers St., Phx / Sunday, Feb 20 / 8pm

Avant-cellist Zoë Keating brings her “one-woman orchestra”, using cello with foot-controlled laptop to loop layer upon layer of cello in a live performance, to Phoenix tomorrow.

Keating has worked with artists such as Imogen Heap, Amanda Palmer, DJ Shadow, and Rasputina, and regularly contributes to the NPR syndicated show Radiolab.

For more info (or tickets) - click HERE.

 

The Compound Grill  (7000 E. Mayo Blvd, Bldg 21) / Sunday, Feb. 27 @ 7:30pm / All Ages / $15

ZOE GOES BOOM: Behind the Geek-Glam Glitz of Zoe Boekbinder

by Pete Petrisko

 

Thoroughly modern, with hints of an earlier era by virtue of her voice, the music of Zoe Boekbinder combines quirkiness and vulnerability in ways not seen often enough in these contemporary times. As a solo artist, and as half of Vermillion Lies, Boekbinder offers glimpses into her delightfully skewed musical worldview through good old-fashioned storytelling.

Below, Boekbinder answers some questions for us about her work and travels, in advance of two solo shows in Arizona this week.

AzK: How would you describe what you do to somebody who has yet to experience it?

ZB: In abstract terms I would say that I surgically remove my most tender guts and dissect them in search of blemishes, sores, and tears to put on display. In real terms, I play music.

AzK: Having attended clown college, how did that help to prepare you for a life in rock and roll?

ZB: A little known fact about clowns is that true clowns (this is my clown snobbishness showing) are always honest. If they are about to tell a lie, they will let you in on it first. Clowns wear their hearts on their noses, hence the red.

Similarly, a really successful musician (or any performer) is completely vulnerable on stage. Honesty in performance is terrifying and incredibly exhilarating for performer and audience.

I bet that answer is more literal than you thought it would be.

AzK: You’ve toured extensively in the last few years, as solo act and as part of Vermillion Lies. What are some of the highlights you’ve seen, and “hidden treasures” you’ve discovered, in your travels?

ZB: There are so many things to choose from: An impromptu tap dancing solo in a dim lit bar in New Orleans, a found-object-art-installation-all-ages-play-ground with a ten story slide and a player organ, an acrobatic pole dancing burlesque duo, a back yard gourmet restaurant.

Perhaps the most memorable place I’ve visited that I’ve had access to through music is New Folsom Prison. Its a level four security prison which means a lot of the guys I’ve met in there are going to live the rest of their lives inside. I’ve done some really interesting collaborations with some of the inmates during my four visits there. It’s by far the most memorable of all the places I’ve ever been.

AzK: There’s a fair amount of awkward love moments, and implied heartbreak, running through your work. How much is inspired by your own unlucky-in-love experiences and how much is simply embellished artistic license?

ZB: It’s 100% one of those options… you decide.

AzK: There seems to be a burgeoning scene of music inspired by an earlier time, specifically late 19th/early 20th century era (what Sepiachord has dubbed “Music Now for a Past that Never Was”), to what do you attribute this growing interest?

ZB: I think we romanticize different periods of history at different times. We do this through fashion and movies and even in social structures and relationships. It happens to be the time to rediscover early 20th century music. It’s good stuff, what can I say?

That said I’m not sure I identify myself in that aesthetic. There are hints of that time in my songs because my voice sounds like a gramophone whether I like it or not. I like to think of my music as a mash up of history and new invention.

AzK: What’s next for Zoe Boekbinder - both as a solo artist and with Vermillion Lies?

ZB: World domination mostly.

Also I’m making plans for a new album that I’ll be recording with Shenandoah Davis as producer in May and June this year. I’m really excited to put my new songs out there. My songs have taken a dark turn and I’m really enjoying it. I had a really hard year and wrote a few really heart wrenching songs that I can’t wait to jerk people’s tears with.

I still really love my first album, Artichoke Perfume, and its unrelenting cheerfulness. I hope my songwriting continues to morph. It would so boring if I only wrote one kind of song forever.

Vermillion Lies has no plans as of now. My sister and I are both focused on our solo projects. My next album and current tour are definitely my priorities right now.

For a taste of Boekbinder’s music, check out her website ZOE GOES BOOM.

Show details:

Wednesday, March 9th @ 8pm | Trunk Space 1506 NW Grand Ave, Phoenix | with Hello The Mind Control, Dakota Bell, and Of The Earth

Friday, March 11th @ 8pm | The Raven Cafe 142 N Cortez St, Prescott | with Paper Bird